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android – How to set DialogFragment's width and height?

Posted by: admin March 10, 2020 Leave a comment

Questions:

I specify the layout of my DialogFragment in an xml layout file (let’s call it layout_mydialogfragment.xml), and its layout_width and layout_height attributes particularly (to be 100dp each let’s say). I then inflate this layout in my DialogFragment’s onCreateView(...) method as follows:

View view = inflater.inflate(R.layout.layout_mydialogfragment, container, false);

Unfortunately, I find that when my dialog (DialogFragment) appears, it does not respect the layout_width and layout_height specified in its xml layout file (and my dialog shrinks or expands variably depending on content). Anyone know whether or how I can get my dialog to respect the layout_width and layout_height specified in its xml layout file? At the moment I’m having to specify the width and height of my dialog again in my DialogFragment’s onResume() method as follows…

getDialog().getWindow().setLayout(width, height);

… And thus, undesirably, have to remember to make any future changes to the dialog’s width and height in two places.

How to&Answers:

If you convert directly from resources values:

int width = getResources().getDimensionPixelSize(R.dimen.popup_width);
int height = getResources().getDimensionPixelSize(R.dimen.popup_height);        
getDialog().getWindow().setLayout(width, height);

Then specify match_parent in your layout for the dialog:

android:layout_width="match_parent"
android:layout_height="match_parent"

You only have to worry about one place (place it in your DialogFragment#onResume). Its not perfect, but at least it works for having a RelativeLayout as the root of your dialog’s layout file.

Answer:

I ended up overriding Fragment.onResume() and grabbing the attributes from the underlying dialog, then setting width/height params there. I set the outermost layout height/width to match_parent. Note that this code seems to respect the margins I defined in the xml layout as well.

@Override
public void onResume() {
    super.onResume();
    ViewGroup.LayoutParams params = getDialog().getWindow().getAttributes();
    params.width = LayoutParams.MATCH_PARENT;
    params.height = LayoutParams.MATCH_PARENT;
    getDialog().getWindow().setAttributes((android.view.WindowManager.LayoutParams) params);
}

Answer:

I got a fixed size DialogFragment defining the following in the XML main layout (LinearLayout in my case):

android:layout_width="match_parent"
android:layout_height="match_parent"
android:minWidth="1000dp"
android:minHeight="450dp"

Answer:

The only thing that worked in my case was the solution pointed here: http://adilatwork.blogspot.mx/2012/11/android-dialogfragment-dialog-sizing.html

Snippet from Adil blog post:

@Override
public void onStart()
{
  super.onStart();

  // safety check
  if (getDialog() == null)
    return;

  int dialogWidth = ... // specify a value here
  int dialogHeight = ... // specify a value here

  getDialog().getWindow().setLayout(dialogWidth, dialogHeight);

  // ... other stuff you want to do in your onStart() method
}

Answer:

One way to control your DialogFragment‘s width and height is to make sure its dialog respects your view’s width and height if their value is WRAP_CONTENT.

Using ThemeOverlay.AppCompat.Dialog

One simple way to achieve this is to make use of the ThemeOverlay.AppCompat.Dialog style that’s included in Android Support Library.

DialogFragment with Dialog:

@NonNull
@Override
public Dialog onCreateDialog(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    LayoutInflater inflater = LayoutInflater.from(getContext());
    View view = inflater.inflate(R.layout.dialog_view, null);

    Dialog dialog = new Dialog(getContext(), R.style.ThemeOverlay_AppCompat_Dialog);
    dialog.setContentView(view);
    return dialog;
}

DialogFragment with AlertDialog (caveat: minHeight="48dp"):

@NonNull
@Override
public Dialog onCreateDialog(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    LayoutInflater inflater = LayoutInflater.from(getContext());
    View view = inflater.inflate(R.layout.dialog_view, null);

    AlertDialog.Builder builder = new AlertDialog.Builder(getContext(), R.style.ThemeOverlay_AppCompat_Dialog);
    builder.setView(view);
    return builder.create();
}

You can also set ThemeOverlay.AppCompat.Dialog as the default theme when creating your dialogs, by adding it to your app’s xml theme.
Be careful, as many dialogs do need the default minimum width to look good.

<!-- Base application theme. -->
<style name="AppTheme" parent="Theme.AppCompat.Light.DarkActionBar">
    <!-- For Android Dialog. -->
    <item name="android:dialogTheme">@style/ThemeOverlay.AppCompat.Dialog</item>

    <!-- For Android AlertDialog. -->
    <item name="android:alertDialogTheme">@style/ThemeOverlay.AppCompat.Dialog</item>

    <!-- For AppCompat AlertDialog. -->
    <item name="alertDialogTheme">@style/ThemeOverlay.AppCompat.Dialog</item>

    <!-- Other attributes. -->
</style>

DialogFragment with Dialog, making use of android:dialogTheme:

@NonNull
@Override
public Dialog onCreateDialog(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    LayoutInflater inflater = LayoutInflater.from(getContext());
    View view = inflater.inflate(R.layout.dialog_view, null);

    Dialog dialog = new Dialog(getContext());
    dialog.setContentView(view);
    return dialog;
}

DialogFragment with AlertDialog, making use of android:alertDialogTheme or alertDialogTheme (caveat: minHeight="48dp"):

@NonNull
@Override
public Dialog onCreateDialog(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    LayoutInflater inflater = LayoutInflater.from(getContext());
    View view = inflater.inflate(R.layout.dialog_view, null);

    AlertDialog.Builder builder = new AlertDialog.Builder(getContext());
    builder.setView(view);
    return builder.create();
}

Bonus

On Older Android APIs, Dialogs seem to have some width issues, because of their title (even if you don’t set one).
If you don’t want to use ThemeOverlay.AppCompat.Dialog style and your Dialog doesn’t need a title (or has a custom one), you might want to disable it:

@NonNull
@Override
public Dialog onCreateDialog(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    LayoutInflater inflater = LayoutInflater.from(getContext());
    View view = inflater.inflate(R.layout.dialog_view, null);

    Dialog dialog = new Dialog(getContext());
    dialog.requestWindowFeature(Window.FEATURE_NO_TITLE);
    dialog.setContentView(view);
    return dialog;
}

Outdated answer, won’t work in most cases

I was trying to make the dialog respect the width and height of my layout, without specifying a fixed size programmatically.

I figured that android:windowMinWidthMinor and android:windowMinWidthMajor were causing the problem. Even though they were not included in the theme of my Activity or Dialog, they were still being applied to the Activity theme, somehow.

I came up with three possible solutions.

Solution 1: create a custom dialog theme and use it when creating the dialog in the DialogFragment.

<style name="Theme.Material.Light.Dialog.NoMinWidth" parent="android:Theme.Material.Light.Dialog">
    <item name="android:windowMinWidthMinor">0dip</item>
    <item name="android:windowMinWidthMajor">0dip</item>
</style>
@Override
public Dialog onCreateDialog(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    return new Dialog(getActivity(), R.style.Theme_Material_Light_Dialog_NoMinWidth);
}

Solution 2: create a custom theme to be used in a ContextThemeWrapper that will serve as Context for the dialog. Use this if you don’t want to create a custom dialog theme (for instance, when you want to use the theme specified by android:dialogTheme).

<style name="Theme.Window.NoMinWidth" parent="">
    <item name="android:windowMinWidthMinor">0dip</item>
    <item name="android:windowMinWidthMajor">0dip</item>
</style>
@Override
public Dialog onCreateDialog(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    return new Dialog(new ContextThemeWrapper(getActivity(), R.style.Theme_Window_NoMinWidth), getTheme());
}

Solution 3 (with an AlertDialog): enforce android:windowMinWidthMinor and android:windowMinWidthMajor into the ContextThemeWrapper created by the AlertDialog$Builder.

<style name="Theme.Window.NoMinWidth" parent="">
    <item name="android:windowMinWidthMinor">0dip</item>
    <item name="android:windowMinWidthMajor">0dip</item>
</style>
@Override
public final Dialog onCreateDialog(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    View view = new View(); // Inflate your view here.
    AlertDialog.Builder builder = new AlertDialog.Builder(getActivity());
    builder.setView(view);
    // Make sure the dialog width works as WRAP_CONTENT.
    builder.getContext().getTheme().applyStyle(R.style.Theme_Window_NoMinWidth, true);
    return builder.create();
}

Answer:

Gotcha #13: DialogFragment Layouts

It’s sort of mind numbing really.

When creating a DialogFragment, you can choose to override onCreateView (which passes a ViewGroup to attach your .xml layout to) or onCreateDialog, which does not.

You mustn’t override both methods tho, because you will very likely confuse Android
as to when or if your dialog’s layout was inflated! WTF?

The choice of whether to override OnCreateDialog or OnCreateView depends on how you intend to use the dialog.

  • If you will launch the dialog in a window (the normal behavior), you are expected to override OnCreateDialog.
  • If you intend to embed the dialog fragment within an existing UI layout (FAR less common), then you are expected to override OnCreateView.

This is possibly the worst thing in the world.

onCreateDialog Insanity

So, you’re overriding onCreateDialog in your DialogFragment to create a customized instance of AlertDialog to display in a window. Cool. But remember, onCreateDialog receives no ViewGroup to attach your custom .xml layout to. No problem, you simply pass null to the inflate method.

Let the madness begin.

When you override onCreateDialog, Android COMPLETELY IGNORES several attributes of the root node of the .xml Layout you inflate. This includes, but probably isn’t limited to:

  • background_color
  • layout_gravity
  • layout_width
  • layout_height

This is almost comical, as you are required to set the layout_width and layout_height of EVERY .xml Layout or Android Studio will slap you with a nice little red badge of shame.

Just the word DialogFragment makes me want to puke. I could write a novel filled with Android gotchas and snafus, but this one is one of the most insideous.

To return to sanity, first, we declare a style to restore JUST the background_color and layout_gravity we expect:

<style name="MyAlertDialog" parent="Theme.AppCompat.Dialog">
    <item name="android:windowBackground">@android:color/transparent</item>
    <item name="android:layout_gravity">center</item>
</style>

The style above inherits from the base theme for Dialogs (in the AppCompat theme in this example).

Next, we apply the style programmatically to put back the values Android just tossed aside and to restore the standard AlertDialog look and feel:

public class MyDialog extends DialogFragment {
    @Override
    public Dialog onCreateDialog(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        View layout = getActivity().getLayoutInflater().inflate(R.layout.my_dialog_layout, null, false);
        assert layout != null;
        //build the alert dialog child of this fragment
        AlertDialog.Builder b = new AlertDialog.Builder(getActivity());
        //restore the background_color and layout_gravity that Android strips
        b.getContext().getTheme().applyStyle(R.style.MyAlertDialog, true);
        b.setView(layout);
        return b.create();
    }
}

The code above will make your AlertDialog look like an AlertDialog again. Maybe this is good enough.

But wait, there’s more!

If you’re looking to set a SPECIFIC layout_width or layout_height for your AlertDialog when it’s shown (very likely), then guess what, you ain’t done yet!

The hilarity continues as you realize that if you attempt to set a specific layout_width or layout_height in your fancy new style, Android will completely ignore that, too!:

<style name="MyAlertDialog" parent="Theme.AppCompat.Dialog">
    <item name="android:windowBackground">@android:color/transparent</item>
    <item name="android:layout_gravity">center</item>
    <!-- NOPE!!!!! --->
    <item name="android:layout_width">200dp</item>
    <!-- NOPE!!!!! --->
    <item name="android:layout_height">200dp</item>
</style>

To set a SPECIFIC window width or height, you get to head on over to a whole ‘nuther method and deal with LayoutParams:

@Override
public void onResume() {
    super.onResume();
    Window window = getDialog().getWindow();
    if(window == null) return;
    WindowManager.LayoutParams params = window.getAttributes();
    params.width = 400;
    params.height = 400;
    window.setAttributes(params);
}

Many folks follow Android’s bad example of casting WindowManager.LayoutParams up to the more general ViewGroup.LayoutParams, only to turn right around and cast ViewGroup.LayoutParams back down to WindowManager.LayoutParams a few lines later. Effective Java be damned, that unnecessary casting offers NOTHING other than making the code even harder to decipher.

Side note: There are some TWENTY repetitions of LayoutParams across the Android SDK – a perfect example of radically poor design.

In Summary

For DialogFragments that override onCreateDialog:

  • To restore the standard AlertDialog look and feel, create a style that sets background_color = transparent and layout_gravity = center and apply that style in onCreateDialog.
  • To set a specific layout_width and/or layout_height, do it programmatically in onResume with LayoutParams
  • To maintain sanity, try not to think about the Android SDK.

Answer:

When I need to make the DialogFragment a bit wider I’m setting minWidth:

<LinearLayout
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent"
    android:minWidth="320dp"
    ... />

Answer:

The dimension in outermost layout doesn’t work in dialog. You can add a layout where set dimension below the outermost.

<RelativeLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
android:layout_width="wrap_content"
android:layout_height="wrap_content">

<LinearLayout
    android:layout_width="xxdp"
    android:layout_height="xxdp"
    android:orientation="vertical">

</LinearLayout>

Answer:

I fixed it setting the root element layout parameters.

int width = activity.getResources().getDisplayMetrics().widthPixels;
int height = activity.getResources().getDisplayMetrics().heightPixels;
content.setLayoutParams(new LinearLayout.LayoutParams(width, height));

Answer:

Here’s a way to set DialogFragment width/height in xml. Just wrap your viewHierarchy in a Framelayout (any layout will work) with a transparent background.

A transparent background seems to be a special flag, because it automatically centers the frameLayout’s child in the window when you do that. You will still get the full screen darkening behind your fragment, indicating your fragment is the active element.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<FrameLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent"
    android:background="@color/transparent">

    <RelativeLayout
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="300dp"
        android:background="@color/background_material_light">

      .....

Answer:

I don’t see a compelling reason to override onResume or onStart to set the width and height of the Window within DialogFragment‘s Dialog — these particular lifecycle methods can get called repeatedly and unnecessarily execute that resizing code more than once due to things like multi window switching, backgrounding then foregrounding the app, and so on. The consequences of that repetition are fairly trivial, but why settle for that?

Setting the width/height instead within an overridden onActivityCreated() method will be an improvement because this method realistically only gets called once per instance of your DialogFragment. For example:

@Override
public void onActivityCreated(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.onActivityCreated(savedInstanceState);

    Window window = getDialog().getWindow();
    assert window != null;

    WindowManager.LayoutParams layoutParams = window.getAttributes();
    layoutParams.width = ViewGroup.LayoutParams.MATCH_PARENT;
    window.setAttributes(layoutParams);
}

Above I just set the width to be match_parent irrespective of device orientation. If you want your landscape dialog to not be so wide, you can do a check of whether getResources().getConfiguration().orientation == Configuration.ORIENTATION_PORTRAIT beforehand.

Answer:

Here is kotlin version

    override fun onResume() {
        super.onResume()

        val params:ViewGroup.LayoutParams = dialog.window.attributes
        params.width = LinearLayout.LayoutParams.MATCH_PARENT
        params.height = LinearLayout.LayoutParams.MATCH_PARENT
        dialog.window.attributes = params as android.view.WindowManager.LayoutParams
    }

Answer:

You can below code to set layout width and height from java.

final AlertDialog alertDialog  = alertDialogBuilder.create();
final WindowManager.LayoutParams WMLP = alertDialog.getWindow().getAttributes();

WMLP.gravity = Gravity.TOP;
WMLP.y = mActionBarHeight;
WMLP.x = getResources().getDimensionPixelSize(R.dimen.unknown_image_width);

alertDialog.getWindow().setAttributes(WMLP);
alertDialog.show();

Answer:

You can use percentage for width.

<style name="Theme.Holo.Dialog.MinWidth">
<item name="android:windowMinWidthMajor">70%</item>

I used Holo Theme for this example.

Answer:

I create the dialog using AlertDialog.Builder so I used Rodrigo’s answer inside a OnShowListener.

dialog.setOnShowListener(new OnShowListener() {

            @Override
            public void onShow(DialogInterface dialogInterface) {
                Display display = getWindowManager().getDefaultDisplay();
                DisplayMetrics outMetrics = new DisplayMetrics ();
                display.getMetrics(outMetrics);
                dialog.getWindow().setLayout((int)(312 * outMetrics.density), (int)(436 * outMetrics.density));
            }

        });

Answer:

Working on Android 6.0, ran into the same issue. AlertDialog would default to predefined width set in the theme regardless of the actual width set in the custom view’s root Layout. I was able to get it to set properly adjusting the width of the loading_message TextView. Without investigating further, it seems that sizing the actual elements and having the root Layout wrap around them makes it work as expected. Below is an XML layout of a loading dialog which sets width of the the dialog correctly. Using the this library for the animation.

<RelativeLayout
    xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:layout_width="wrap_content"
    android:layout_height="wrap_content"
    android:background="@color/custom_color"
    android:padding="@dimen/custom_dimen">
    <com.github.rahatarmanahmed.cpv.CircularProgressView
        xmlns:app="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res-auto"
        android:id="@+id/progress_view"
        android:layout_width="40dp"
        android:layout_height="40dp"
        android:layout_centerHorizontal="true"
        app:cpv_color="@color/white"
        app:cpv_animAutostart="true"
        app:cpv_indeterminate="true" />
    <TextView
        android:id="@+id/loading_message"
        android:layout_width="100dp"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_below="@+id/progress_view"
        android:layout_centerHorizontal="true"
        android:gravity="center"
        android:textSize="18dp"
        android:layout_marginTop="@dimen/custom_dimen"
        android:textColor="@color/white"
        android:text="@string/custom_string"/>
</RelativeLayout>

Answer:

In my case it was caused by align_parentBottom="true" given to a view inside a RelativeLayout. Removed all the alignParentBottom’s and changed all the layouts to vertical LinearLayouts and problem gone.

Answer:

Set the Parent layout of Custom dialogue layout to RelativeLayout, get common width and height automatically .

<RelativeLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
android:layout_width="match_parent"
android:layout_height="match_parent">

Answer:

One of the earlier solutions almost worked. I tried something slightly different and it ended up working for me.

(Make sure you look at his solution)
This was his solution.. Click Here
It worked except for: builder.getContext().getTheme().applyStyle(R.style.Theme_Window_NoMinWidth, true);

I changed it to

 @Override
    public Dialog onCreateDialog(Bundle savedInstanceState) {


        // Use the Builder class for convenient dialog construction
        AlertDialog.Builder builder = new AlertDialog.Builder(getActivity());

        // Get layout inflater
        LayoutInflater layoutInflater = getActivity().getLayoutInflater();

        // Set layout by setting view that is returned from inflating the XML layout
        builder.setView(layoutInflater.inflate(R.layout.dialog_window_layout, null));


        AlertDialog dialog = builder.create();

        dialog.getContext().setTheme(R.style.Theme_Window_NoMinWidth);

The last line is whats different really.

Answer:

Easy and solid:

@Override
    public void onResume() {
        // Sets the height and the width of the DialogFragment
        int width = ConstraintLayout.LayoutParams.MATCH_PARENT;
        int height = ConstraintLayout.LayoutParams.MATCH_PARENT;
        getDialog().getWindow().setLayout(width, height);

        super.onResume();
    }

Answer:

This is the simplest solution

The best solution I have found is to override onCreateDialog() instead of onCreateView(). setContentView() will set the correct window dimensions before inflating. It removes the need to store/set a dimension, background color, style, etc in resource files and setting them manually.

@Override
public Dialog onCreateDialog(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    Dialog dialog = new Dialog(getActivity());
    dialog.setContentView(R.layout.fragment_dialog);

    Button button = (Button) dialog.findViewById(R.id.dialog_button);
    // ...
    return dialog;
}

Answer:

@Override
public void onStart() {
    super.onStart();
    Dialog dialog = getDialog();
    if (dialog != null)
    {
        dialog.getWindow().setLayout(-1, -2);
        dialog.getWindow().getAttributes().windowAnimations = R.style.DialogAnimation;
        Window window = getDialog().getWindow();
        WindowManager.LayoutParams params = window.getAttributes();
        params.dimAmount = 1.0f;
        window.setAttributes(params);
        window.setBackgroundDrawableResource(android.R.color.transparent);
    }
}

Answer:

Add to your FragmentDialog:

public void onResume() {
    Window window = getDialog().getWindow();
    Point size = new Point();
    Display display = window.getWindowManager().getDefaultDisplay();
    display.getSize(size);
    window.setLayout( (int)(size.x * 0.9), WindowManager.LayoutParams.WRAP_CONTENT );
    window.setGravity( Gravity.CENTER );
    super.onResume();
}

Answer:

This will work perfectly.

@Override
public void onResume() {
    super.onResume();
    Window window = getDialog().getWindow();
    if(window == null) return;
    WindowManager.LayoutParams params = window.getAttributes();
    params.width = 400;
    params.height = 400;
    window.setAttributes(params);
}

Answer:

To get a Dialog that covers almost the entire scree: First define a ScreenParameter class

public class ScreenParameters
{
    public static int Width;
    public static  int Height;

    public ScreenParameters()
    {
        LayoutParams l = new LayoutParams(LayoutParams.MATCH_PARENT,LayoutParams.MATCH_PARENT);
        Width= l.width;
        Height = l.height;
    }
}

Then you have to call the ScreenParamater before your getDialog.getWindow().setLayout() method

@Override
public void onResume()
{
    super.onResume();
    ScreenParameters s = new ScreenParameters();
    getDialog().getWindow().setLayout(s.Width , s.Height);
}