Home » Android » android – Show dialog from fragment?

android – Show dialog from fragment?

Posted by: admin March 11, 2020 Leave a comment

Questions:

I have some fragments that need to show a regular dialog. On these dialogs the user can choose a yes/no answer, and then the fragment should behave accordingly.

Now, the Fragment class doesn’t have an onCreateDialog() method to override, so I guess I have to implement the dialogs outside, in the containing Activity. It’s ok, but then the Activity needs to report back the chosen answer somehow to the fragment. I could of course use a callback pattern here, so the fragment registers itself at the Activity with a listener class, and the Activity would report back the answer thru that, or something like that.

But this seems to be quite a big mess for a simple task as displaying a “simple” yes-no dialog in a fragment. Also, this way my Fragment would be less self-contained.

Is there some cleaner way to do this?

Edit:

The answer to this question doesn’t really explain in detail how one should use DialogFragments to display dialogs from Fragments. So AFAIK, the way to go is:

  1. Display a Fragment.
  2. When needed, instantiate a DialogFragment.
  3. Set the original Fragment as the target of this DialogFragment, with .setTargetFragment().
  4. Show the DialogFragment with .show() from the original Fragment.
  5. When the user chooses some option on this DialogFragment, notify the original Fragment about this selection (e.g. the user clicked ‘yes’), you can get the reference of the original Fragment with .getTarget().
  6. Dismiss the DialogFragment.
How to&Answers:

You should use a DialogFragment instead.

Answer:

I must cautiously doubt the previously accepted answer that using a DialogFragment is the best option. The intended (primary) purpose of the DialogFragment seems to be to display fragments that are dialogs themselves, not to display fragments that have dialogs to display.

I believe that using the fragment’s activity to mediate between the dialog and the fragment is the preferable option.

Answer:

Here is a full example of a yes/no DialogFragment:

The class:

public class SomeDialog extends DialogFragment {

    @Override
    public Dialog onCreateDialog(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        return new AlertDialog.Builder(getActivity())
            .setTitle("Title")
            .setMessage("Sure you wanna do this!")
            .setNegativeButton(android.R.string.no, new OnClickListener() {
                @Override
                public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
                    // do nothing (will close dialog)
                }
            })
            .setPositiveButton(android.R.string.yes,  new OnClickListener() {
                @Override
                public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
                    // do something
                }
            })
            .create();
    }
}

To start dialog:

        FragmentTransaction ft = getSupportFragmentManager().beginTransaction();
        // Create and show the dialog.
        SomeDialog newFragment = new SomeDialog ();
        newFragment.show(ft, "dialog");

You could also let the class implement onClickListener and use that instead of embedded listeners.

Callback to Activity

If you want to implement callback this is how it is done
In your activity:

YourActivity extends Activity implements OnFragmentClickListener

and

@Override
public void onFragmentClick(int action, Object object) {
    switch(action) {
        case SOME_ACTION:
        //Do your action here
        break;
    }
}

The callback class:

public interface OnFragmentClickListener {
    public void onFragmentClick(int action, Object object);
}

Then to perform a callback from a fragment you need to make sure the listener is attached like this:

@Override
public void onAttach(Activity activity) {
    super.onAttach(activity);
    try {
        mListener = (OnFragmentClickListener) activity;
    } catch (ClassCastException e) {
        throw new ClassCastException(activity.toString() + " must implement listeners!");
    }
}

And a callback is performed like this:

mListener.onFragmentClick(SOME_ACTION, null); // null or some important object as second parameter.

Answer:

For me, it was the following-

MyFragment:

public class MyFragment extends Fragment implements MyDialog.Callback
{
    ShowDialog activity_showDialog;

    @Override
    public void onAttach(Activity activity)
    {
        super.onAttach(activity);
        try
        {
            activity_showDialog = (ShowDialog)activity;
        }
        catch(ClassCastException e)
        {
            Log.e(this.getClass().getSimpleName(), "ShowDialog interface needs to be     implemented by Activity.", e);
            throw e;
        }
    }

    @Override
    public void onClick(View view) 
    {
        ...
        MyDialog dialog = new MyDialog();
        dialog.setTargetFragment(this, 1); //request code
        activity_showDialog.showDialog(dialog);
        ...
    }

    @Override
    public void accept()
    {
        //accept
    }

    @Override
    public void decline()
    {
        //decline
    }

    @Override
    public void cancel()
    {
        //cancel
    }

}

MyDialog:

public class MyDialog extends DialogFragment implements View.OnClickListener
{
    private EditText mEditText;
    private Button acceptButton;
    private Button rejectButton;
    private Button cancelButton;

    public static interface Callback
    {
        public void accept();
        public void decline();
        public void cancel();
    }

    public MyDialog()
    {
        // Empty constructor required for DialogFragment
    }

    @Override
    public View onCreateView(LayoutInflater inflater, ViewGroup container, Bundle savedInstanceState)
    {
        View view = inflater.inflate(R.layout.dialogfragment, container);
        acceptButton = (Button) view.findViewById(R.id.dialogfragment_acceptbtn);
        rejectButton = (Button) view.findViewById(R.id.dialogfragment_rejectbtn);
        cancelButton = (Button) view.findViewById(R.id.dialogfragment_cancelbtn);
        acceptButton.setOnClickListener(this);
        rejectButton.setOnClickListener(this);
        cancelButton.setOnClickListener(this);
        getDialog().setTitle(R.string.dialog_title);
        return view;
    }

    @Override
    public void onClick(View v)
    {
        Callback callback = null;
        try
        {
            callback = (Callback) getTargetFragment();
        }
        catch (ClassCastException e)
        {
            Log.e(this.getClass().getSimpleName(), "Callback of this class must be implemented by target fragment!", e);
            throw e;
        }

        if (callback != null)
        {
            if (v == acceptButton)
            {   
                callback.accept();
                this.dismiss();
            }
            else if (v == rejectButton)
            {
                callback.decline();
                this.dismiss();
            }
            else if (v == cancelButton)
            {
                callback.cancel();
                this.dismiss();
            }
        }
    }
}

Activity:

public class MyActivity extends ActionBarActivity implements ShowDialog
{
    ..

    @Override
    public void showDialog(DialogFragment dialogFragment)
    {
        FragmentManager fragmentManager = getSupportFragmentManager();
        dialogFragment.show(fragmentManager, "dialog");
    }
}

DialogFragment layout:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<RelativeLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:layout_width="wrap_content"
    android:layout_height="wrap_content"
    android:layout_gravity="center"
    android:orientation="vertical" >

    <TextView
        android:id="@+id/dialogfragment_textview"
        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_marginTop="20dp"
        android:layout_centerHorizontal="true"
        android:layout_marginBottom="10dp"
        android:text="@string/example"/>

    <Button
        android:id="@+id/dialogfragment_acceptbtn"
        android:layout_width="200dp"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_marginTop="20dp"
        android:layout_centerHorizontal="true"
        android:layout_below="@+id/dialogfragment_textview"
        android:text="@string/accept"
        />

    <Button
        android:id="@+id/dialogfragment_rejectbtn"
        android:layout_width="200dp"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_marginTop="10dp"
        android:layout_alignLeft="@+id/dialogfragment_acceptbtn"
        android:layout_below="@+id/dialogfragment_acceptbtn"
        android:text="@string/decline" />

     <Button
        android:id="@+id/dialogfragment_cancelbtn"
        android:layout_width="200dp"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_marginTop="10dp"
        android:layout_marginBottom="20dp"
        android:layout_alignLeft="@+id/dialogfragment_rejectbtn"
        android:layout_below="@+id/dialogfragment_rejectbtn"
        android:text="@string/cancel" />

     <Button
        android:id="@+id/dialogfragment_heightfixhiddenbtn"
        android:layout_width="200dp"
        android:layout_height="20dp"
        android:layout_marginTop="10dp"
        android:layout_marginBottom="20dp"
        android:layout_alignLeft="@+id/dialogfragment_cancelbtn"
        android:layout_below="@+id/dialogfragment_cancelbtn"
        android:background="@android:color/transparent"
        android:enabled="false"
        android:text=" " />
</RelativeLayout>

As the name dialogfragment_heightfixhiddenbtn shows, I just couldn’t figure out a way to fix that the bottom button’s height was cut in half despite saying wrap_content, so I added a hidden button to be “cut” in half instead. Sorry for the hack.

Answer:

 public void showAlert(){


     AlertDialog.Builder alertDialog = new AlertDialog.Builder(getActivity());
     LayoutInflater inflater = getActivity().getLayoutInflater();
     View alertDialogView = inflater.inflate(R.layout.test_dialog, null);
     alertDialog.setView(alertDialogView);

     TextView textDialog = (TextView) alertDialogView.findViewById(R.id.text_testDialogMsg);
     textDialog.setText(questionMissing);

     alertDialog.setPositiveButton("Ok", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
         public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
             dialog.cancel();
         }
     });
     alertDialog.show();

}

where .test_dialog is of xml custom

Answer:

I am a beginner myself and I honestly couldn’t find a satisfactory answer that I could understand or implement.

So here’s an external link that I really helped me achieved what I wanted. It’s very straight forward and easy to follow as well.

http://www.helloandroid.com/tutorials/how-display-custom-dialog-your-android-application

THIS WHAT I TRIED TO ACHIEVE WITH THE CODE:

I have a MainActivity that hosts a Fragment. I wanted a dialog to appear on top of the layout to ask for user input and then process the input accordingly.
See a screenshot

Here’s what the onCreateView of my fragment looks

@Nullable
@Override
public View onCreateView(LayoutInflater inflater, @Nullable ViewGroup container, @Nullable Bundle savedInstanceState) {

    View rootView = inflater.inflate(R.layout.fragment_home_activity, container, false);

    Button addTransactionBtn = rootView.findViewById(R.id.addTransactionBtn);

    addTransactionBtn.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {
        @Override
        public void onClick(View view) {
            Dialog dialog = new Dialog(getActivity());
            dialog.setContentView(R.layout.dialog_trans);
            dialog.setTitle("Add an Expense");
            dialog.setCancelable(true);

            dialog.show();

        }
    });

I hope it will help you

Let me know if there’s any confusion. 🙂

Answer:

    public static void OpenDialog (Activity activity, DialogFragment fragment){

    final FragmentManager fm = ((FragmentActivity)activity).getSupportFragmentManager();

    fragment.show(fm, "tag");
}