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android – Show DialogFragment with animation growing from a point

Posted by: admin March 11, 2020 Leave a comment

Questions:

I’m showing a DialogFragment when the user taps on a row in a ListView. I’d like to animate the showing of the dialog so that it grows from the center of the row. A similar effect can be seen when opening a folder from the launcher.

One idea that I’ve had is a combination of TranslateAnimation and ScaleAnimation. Is there another way?

How to&Answers:

Being DialogFragment a wrapper for the Dialog class, you should set a theme to your base Dialog to get the animation you want:

public class CustomDialogFragment extends DialogFragment implements OnEditorActionListener
{
    @Override
    public View onCreateView(LayoutInflater inflater, ViewGroup container,
        Bundle savedInstanceState) 
    {
        return super.onCreateView(inflater, container, savedInstanceState);
    }

    @Override
    public Dialog onCreateDialog(Bundle savedInstanceState) 
    {
        // Set a theme on the dialog builder constructor!
        AlertDialog.Builder builder = 
            new AlertDialog.Builder( getActivity(), R.style.MyCustomTheme );

        builder  
        .setTitle( "Your title" )
        .setMessage( "Your message" )
        .setPositiveButton( "OK" , new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() 
            {      
              @Override
              public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
              dismiss();                  
            }
        });
        return builder.create();
    }
}

Then you just need to define the theme that will include your desired animation. In styles.xml add your custom theme:

<style name="MyCustomTheme" parent="@android:style/Theme.Panel">
    <item name="android:windowAnimationStyle">@style/MyAnimation.Window</item>
</style>

<style name="MyAnimation.Window" parent="@android:style/Animation.Activity"> 
    <item name="android:windowEnterAnimation">@anim/anim_in</item>
    <item name="android:windowExitAnimation">@anim/anim_out</item>
</style>    

Now add the animation files in the res/anim folder:

( the android:pivotY is the key )

anim_in.xml

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<set xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android">
    <scale
        android:interpolator="@android:anim/linear_interpolator"
        android:fromXScale="0.0"
        android:toXScale="1.0"
        android:fromYScale="0.0"
        android:toYScale="1.0"
        android:fillAfter="false"
        android:startOffset="200"
        android:duration="200" 
        android:pivotX = "50%"
        android:pivotY = "-90%"
    />
    <translate
        android:fromYDelta="50%"
        android:toYDelta="0"
        android:startOffset="200"
        android:duration="200"
    />
</set>

anim_out.xml

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<set xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android">
    <scale
        android:interpolator="@android:anim/linear_interpolator"
        android:fromXScale="1.0"
        android:toXScale="0.0"
        android:fromYScale="1.0"
        android:toYScale="0.0"
        android:fillAfter="false"
        android:duration="200" 
        android:pivotX = "50%"        
        android:pivotY = "-90%"        
    />
    <translate
        android:fromYDelta="0"
        android:toYDelta="50%"
        android:duration="200"
    />
</set>

Finally, the tricky thing here is to get your animation grow from the center of each row. I suppose the row is filling the screen horizontally so, on one hand the android:pivotX value will be static. On the other hand, you can’t modify the android:pivotY value programmatically.

What I suggest is, you define several animations each of which having a different percentage value on the android:pivotY attribute (and several themes referencing those animations). Then, when the user taps the row, calculate the Y position in percentage of the row on the screen. Knowing the position in percentage, assign a theme to your dialog that has the appropriate android:pivotY value.

It is not a perfect solution but could do the trick for you. If you don’t like the result, then I would suggest forgetting the DialogFragment and animating a simple View growing from the exact center of the row.

Good luck!

Answer:

Check it out this code, it works for me

// Slide up animation

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?> <set xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android" >

    <translate
        android:duration="@android:integer/config_mediumAnimTime"
        android:fromYDelta="100%"
        android:interpolator="@android:anim/accelerate_interpolator"
        android:toXDelta="0" />

</set>

// Slide dowm animation

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<set xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android" >

    <translate
        android:duration="@android:integer/config_mediumAnimTime"
        android:fromYDelta="0%p"
        android:interpolator="@android:anim/accelerate_interpolator"
        android:toYDelta="100%p" />

</set>

// Style

<style name="DialogAnimation">
    <item name="android:windowEnterAnimation">@anim/slide_up</item>
    <item name="android:windowExitAnimation">@anim/slide_down</item>
</style>

// Inside Dialog Fragment

@Override
public void onActivityCreated(Bundle arg0) {
    super.onActivityCreated(arg0);
    getDialog().getWindow()
    .getAttributes().windowAnimations = R.style.DialogAnimation;
}

Answer:

DialogFragment has a public getTheme() method that you can over ride for this exact reason. This solution uses less lines of code:

public class MyCustomDialogFragment extends DialogFragment{
    ...
    @Override
    public int getTheme() {
        return R.style.MyThemeWithCustomAnimation;
    }
}

Answer:

To get a full-screen dialog with animation, write the following …

Styles:

<style name="AppTheme" parent="Theme.AppCompat.Light.DarkActionBar">
    <item name="colorPrimary">@color/colorPrimary</item>
    <item name="colorPrimaryDark">@color/colorPrimaryDark</item>
    <item name="colorAccent">@color/colorAccent</item>
    <item name="actionModeBackground">?attr/colorPrimary</item>
    <item name="windowActionModeOverlay">true</item>
</style>

<style name="AppTheme.NoActionBar">
    <item name="windowActionBar">false</item>
    <item name="windowNoTitle">true</item>
</style>

<style name="AppTheme.NoActionBar.FullScreenDialog">
    <item name="android:windowAnimationStyle">@style/Animation.WindowSlideUpDown</item>
</style>

<style name="Animation.WindowSlideUpDown" parent="@android:style/Animation.Activity">
    <item name="android:windowEnterAnimation">@anim/slide_up</item>
    <item name="android:windowExitAnimation">@anim/slide_down</item>
</style>

res/anim/slide_up.xml

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<set xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
     android:shareInterpolator="@android:interpolator/accelerate_quad">

    <translate
        android:duration="@android:integer/config_shortAnimTime"
        android:fromYDelta="100%"
        android:toYDelta="0%"/>
</set>

res/anim/slide_down.xml

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<set xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
     android:shareInterpolator="@android:interpolator/accelerate_quad">

    <translate
        android:duration="@android:integer/config_shortAnimTime"
        android:fromYDelta="0%"
        android:toYDelta="100%"/>
</set>

Java code:

public class MyDialog extends DialogFragment {

    @Override
    public int getTheme() {
        return R.style.AppTheme_NoActionBar_FullScreenDialog;
    }
}

private void showDialog() {
    FragmentTransaction fragmentTransaction = getSupportFragmentManager().beginTransaction();
    Fragment previous = getSupportFragmentManager().findFragmentByTag(MyDialog.class.getName());
    if (previous != null) {
        fragmentTransaction.remove(previous);
    }
    fragmentTransaction.addToBackStack(null);

    MyDialog dialog = new MyDialog();
    dialog.show(fragmentTransaction, MyDialog.class.getName());
}

Answer:

Use decor view inside onStart in your dialog fragment

@Override
public void onStart() {
    super.onStart();


    final View decorView = getDialog()
            .getWindow()
            .getDecorView();

    decorView.animate().translationY(-100)
            .setStartDelay(300)
            .setDuration(300)
            .start();

}

Answer:

In DialogFragment, custom animation is called onCreateDialog. ‘DialogAnimation’ is custom animation style in previous answer.

public Dialog onCreateDialog(Bundle savedInstanceState) 
{
    final Dialog dialog = super.onCreateDialog(savedInstanceState);
    dialog.getWindow().getAttributes().windowAnimations = R.style.DialogAnimation;
    return dialog;
}

Answer:

Have you looked at Android Developers Training on Zooming a View? Might be a good starting point.

You probably want to create a custom class extending DialogFragment to get this working.

Also, take a look at Jake Whartons NineOldAndroids for Honeycomb Animation API compatibility all the way back to API Level 1.

Answer:

If you want to work over APIs you have to do inside your DialogFragemnt->onStart and not inside onCreateDialog

@Override
    public void onStart() 
    {
        if (getDialog() == null) 
        {
            return;
        }

        getDialog().getWindow().setWindowAnimations(
                  R.style.DlgAnimation);

        super.onStart();
    }

Answer:

Colateral’s solution worked for me. However, I encountered an annoying issue with the animation: it played not only when my dialog was created and destroyed, but also when the app went into and out of background (that is, every onStart() and onStop()).

First of all, make sure you pay attention to the distinction between

window.attributes.windowAnimations = R.style.CustomDialogAnimation

and

window.setWindowAnimations(R.style.CustomAnimation)

The latter not only changes the attribute but also dispatches the change. Just altering the attribute alone won’t have any effect after your dialog has been created.

So here’s my (not utterly elegant) approach to the problem with redundant animations:

override fun onStart() {
    super.onStart()

    enableWindowAnimations()
    view?.post {
        disableWindowAnimation()
    }
}

override fun dismiss() {
    enableWindowAnimations()
    view?.post {
        super.dismiss()
    }
}

private fun enableWindowAnimations() {
    dialog
        ?.window
        ?.setWindowAnimations(R.style.CustomAnimation)
}

private fun disableWindowAnimation() {
    dialog
        ?.window
        ?.setWindowAnimations(0)
}

Another solution is to get rid of windowAnimations altogether and animate window.decorView, as described here. It will give you more control over your animations.