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Convert java.util.Date to java.time.LocalDate

Posted by: admin November 2, 2017 Leave a comment

Questions:

What is the best way to convert a java.util.Date object to the new JDK 8/JSR-310 java.time.LocalDate?

Date input = new Date();
LocalDate date = ???
Answers:

Short answer

Date input = new Date();
LocalDate date = input.toInstant().atZone(ZoneId.systemDefault()).toLocalDate();

Explanation

Despite its name, java.util.Date represents an instant on the time-line, not a “date”. The actual data stored within the object is a long count of milliseconds since 1970-01-01T00:00Z (midnight at the start of 1970 GMT/UTC).

The equivalent class to java.util.Date in JSR-310 is Instant, thus there is a convenient method toInstant() to provide the conversion:

Date input = new Date();
Instant instant = input.toInstant();

A java.util.Date instance has no concept of time-zone. This might seem strange if you call toString() on a java.util.Date, because the toString is relative to a time-zone. However that method actually uses Java’s default time-zone on the fly to provide the string. The time-zone is not part of the actual state of java.util.Date.

An Instant also does not contain any information about the time-zone. Thus, to convert from an Instant to a local date it is necessary to specify a time-zone. This might be the default zone – ZoneId.systemDefault() – or it might be a time-zone that your application controls, such as a time-zone from user preferences. Use the atZone() method to apply the time-zone:

Date input = new Date();
Instant instant = input.toInstant();
ZonedDateTime zdt = instant.atZone(ZoneId.systemDefault());

A ZonedDateTime contains state consisting of the local date and time, time-zone and the offset from GMT/UTC. As such the date – LocalDate – can be easily extracted using toLocalDate():

Date input = new Date();
Instant instant = input.toInstant();
ZonedDateTime zdt = instant.atZone(ZoneId.systemDefault());
LocalDate date = zdt.toLocalDate();

Java 9 answer

In Java SE 9, a new method has been added that slightly simplifies this task:

Date input = new Date();
LocalDate date = LocalDate.ofInstant(input.toInstant(), ZoneId.systemDefault());

This new alternative is more direct, creating less garbage, and thus should perform better.

Questions:
Answers:

Better way is:

Date date = ...;
Instant.ofEpochMilli(date.getTime()).atZone(ZoneId.systemDefault()).toLocalDate()

Advantages of this version:

  • works regardless the input is an instance of java.util.Date or it’s subclass java.sql.Date (unlike @JodaStephen’s way). This is common with JDBC originated data. java.sql.Date.toInstant() always throws an exception.

  • it’s the same for JDK8 and JDK7 with JSR-310 backport

I personally use an utility class (but this is not backport-compatible):

/**
 * Utilities for conversion between the old and new JDK date types 
 * (between {@code java.util.Date} and {@code java.time.*}).
 * 
 * <p>
 * All methods are null-safe.
 */
public class DateConvertUtils {

    /**
     * Calls {@link #asLocalDate(Date, ZoneId)} with the system default time zone.
     */
    public static LocalDate asLocalDate(java.util.Date date) {
        return asLocalDate(date, ZoneId.systemDefault());
    }

    /**
     * Creates {@link LocalDate} from {@code java.util.Date} or it's subclasses. Null-safe.
     */
    public static LocalDate asLocalDate(java.util.Date date, ZoneId zone) {
        if (date == null)
            return null;

        if (date instanceof java.sql.Date)
            return ((java.sql.Date) date).toLocalDate();
        else
            return Instant.ofEpochMilli(date.getTime()).atZone(zone).toLocalDate();
    }

    /**
     * Calls {@link #asLocalDateTime(Date, ZoneId)} with the system default time zone.
     */
    public static LocalDateTime asLocalDateTime(java.util.Date date) {
        return asLocalDateTime(date, ZoneId.systemDefault());
    }

    /**
     * Creates {@link LocalDateTime} from {@code java.util.Date} or it's subclasses. Null-safe.
     */
    public static LocalDateTime asLocalDateTime(java.util.Date date, ZoneId zone) {
        if (date == null)
            return null;

        if (date instanceof java.sql.Timestamp)
            return ((java.sql.Timestamp) date).toLocalDateTime();
        else
            return Instant.ofEpochMilli(date.getTime()).atZone(zone).toLocalDateTime();
    }

    /**
     * Calls {@link #asUtilDate(Object, ZoneId)} with the system default time zone.
     */
    public static java.util.Date asUtilDate(Object date) {
        return asUtilDate(date, ZoneId.systemDefault());
    }

    /**
     * Creates a {@link java.util.Date} from various date objects. Is null-safe. Currently supports:<ul>
     * <li>{@link java.util.Date}
     * <li>{@link java.sql.Date}
     * <li>{@link java.sql.Timestamp}
     * <li>{@link java.time.LocalDate}
     * <li>{@link java.time.LocalDateTime}
     * <li>{@link java.time.ZonedDateTime}
     * <li>{@link java.time.Instant}
     * </ul>
     * 
     * @param zone Time zone, used only if the input object is LocalDate or LocalDateTime.
     * 
     * @return {@link java.util.Date} (exactly this class, not a subclass, such as java.sql.Date)
     */
    public static java.util.Date asUtilDate(Object date, ZoneId zone) {
        if (date == null)
            return null;

        if (date instanceof java.sql.Date || date instanceof java.sql.Timestamp)
            return new java.util.Date(((java.util.Date) date).getTime());
        if (date instanceof java.util.Date)
            return (java.util.Date) date;
        if (date instanceof LocalDate)
            return java.util.Date.from(((LocalDate) date).atStartOfDay(zone).toInstant());
        if (date instanceof LocalDateTime)
            return java.util.Date.from(((LocalDateTime) date).atZone(zone).toInstant());
        if (date instanceof ZonedDateTime)
            return java.util.Date.from(((ZonedDateTime) date).toInstant());
        if (date instanceof Instant)
            return java.util.Date.from((Instant) date);

        throw new UnsupportedOperationException("Don't know hot to convert " + date.getClass().getName() + " to java.util.Date");
    }

    /**
     * Creates an {@link Instant} from {@code java.util.Date} or it's subclasses. Null-safe.
     */
    public static Instant asInstant(Date date) {
        if (date == null)
            return null;
        else
            return Instant.ofEpochMilli(date.getTime());
    }

    /**
     * Calls {@link #asZonedDateTime(Date, ZoneId)} with the system default time zone.
     */
    public static ZonedDateTime asZonedDateTime(Date date) {
        return asZonedDateTime(date, ZoneId.systemDefault());
    }

    /**
     * Creates {@link ZonedDateTime} from {@code java.util.Date} or it's subclasses. Null-safe.
     */
    public static ZonedDateTime asZonedDateTime(Date date, ZoneId zone) {
        if (date == null)
            return null;
        else
            return asInstant(date).atZone(zone);
    }

}

The asLocalDate() method here is null-safe, uses toLocalDate(), if input is java.sql.Date (it may be overriden by the JDBC driver to avoid timezone problems or unnecessary calculations), otherwise uses the abovementioned method.

Questions:
Answers:

If you’re using Java 8, @JodaStephen’s answer is obviously the best. However, if you’re working with the JSR-310 backport, you unfortunately have to do something like this:

Date input = new Date();
Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
cal.setTime(input);
LocalDate date = LocalDate.of(cal.get(Calendar.YEAR),
        cal.get(Calendar.MONTH) + 1,
        cal.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH));

Questions:
Answers:
LocalDate ld = new java.sql.Date( new java.util.Date().getTime() ).toLocalDate();

Questions:
Answers:
LocalDate localDate = LocalDate.parse( new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd").format(date) );

Questions:
Answers:

I have had problems with @JodaStephen’s implementation on JBoss EAP 6. So, I rewrote the conversion following Oracle’s Java Tutorial in http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/datetime/iso/legacy.html.

    Date input = new Date();
    GregorianCalendar gregorianCalendar = (GregorianCalendar) Calendar.getInstance();
    gregorianCalendar.setTime(input);
    ZonedDateTime zonedDateTime = gregorianCalendar.toZonedDateTime();
    zonedDateTime.toLocalDate();

Questions:
Answers:
public static LocalDate Date2LocalDate(Date date) {
        return LocalDate.parse(date.toString(), DateTimeFormatter.ofPattern("EEE MMM dd HH:mm:ss zzz yyyy"))

this format is from Date#tostring

    public String toString() {
        // "EEE MMM dd HH:mm:ss zzz yyyy";
        BaseCalendar.Date date = normalize();
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(28);
        int index = date.getDayOfWeek();
        if (index == BaseCalendar.SUNDAY) {
            index = 8;
        }
        convertToAbbr(sb, wtb[index]).append(' ');                        // EEE
        convertToAbbr(sb, wtb[date.getMonth() - 1 + 2 + 7]).append(' ');  // MMM
        CalendarUtils.sprintf0d(sb, date.getDayOfMonth(), 2).append(' '); // dd

        CalendarUtils.sprintf0d(sb, date.getHours(), 2).append(':');   // HH
        CalendarUtils.sprintf0d(sb, date.getMinutes(), 2).append(':'); // mm
        CalendarUtils.sprintf0d(sb, date.getSeconds(), 2).append(' '); // ss
        TimeZone zi = date.getZone();
        if (zi != null) {
            sb.append(zi.getDisplayName(date.isDaylightTime(), TimeZone.SHORT, Locale.US)); // zzz
        } else {
            sb.append("GMT");
        }
        sb.append(' ').append(date.getYear());  // yyyy
        return sb.toString();
    }

Questions:
Answers:
java.util.Date date = (java.util.Date) java.sql.Date.valueOf(localDate);  
LocalDate localDate = ((java.sql.Date)java.util.Date).toLocalDate();

Questions:
Answers:

I solved this question with solution below

  import org.joda.time.LocalDate;
  Date myDate = new Date();
  LocalDate localDate = LocalDate.fromDateFields(myDate);
  System.out.println("My date using Date" Nov 18 11:23:33 BRST 2016);
  System.out.println("My date using joda.time LocalTime" 2016-11-18);

In this case localDate print your date in this format “yyyy-MM-dd”