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Django form – set label

Posted by: admin November 30, 2017 Leave a comment

Questions:

I have a form that inherits from 2 other forms. In my form, I want to change the label of a field that was defined in one of the parent forms. Does anyone know how this can be done?

I’m trying to do it in my __init__, but it throws an error saying that “‘RegistrationFormTOS’ object has no attribute ’email'”. Does anyone know how I can do this?

Thanks.

Here is my form code:

from django import forms
from django.utils.translation import ugettext_lazy as _
from registration.forms import RegistrationFormUniqueEmail
from registration.forms import RegistrationFormTermsOfService

attrs_dict = { 'class': 'required' }

class RegistrationFormTOS(RegistrationFormUniqueEmail, RegistrationFormTermsOfService):
    """
    Subclass of ``RegistrationForm`` which adds a required checkbox
    for agreeing to a site's Terms of Service.

    """
    email2 = forms.EmailField(widget=forms.TextInput(attrs=dict(attrs_dict, maxlength=75)), label=_(u'verify email address'))

    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        self.email.label = "New Email Label"
        super(RegistrationFormTOS, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)

    def clean_email2(self):
        """
        Verifiy that the values entered into the two email fields
        match. 
        """
        if 'email' in self.cleaned_data and 'email2' in self.cleaned_data:
            if self.cleaned_data['email'] != self.cleaned_data['email2']:
                raise forms.ValidationError(_(u'You must type the same email each time'))
        return self.cleaned_data
Answers:

You should use:

def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
    super(RegistrationFormTOS, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
    self.fields['email'].label = "New Email Label"

Note first you should use the super call.

Questions:
Answers:

Here’s an example taken from Overriding the default fields:

from django.utils.translation import ugettext_lazy as _

class AuthorForm(ModelForm):
    class Meta:
        model = Author
        fields = ('name', 'title', 'birth_date')
        labels = {
            'name': _('Writer'),
        }
        help_texts = {
            'name': _('Some useful help text.'),
        }
        error_messages = {
            'name': {
                'max_length': _("This writer's name is too long."),
            },
        }
Questions:
Answers:

You access fields in a form via the ‘fields’ dict:

self.fields['email'].label = "New Email Label"

That’s so that you don’t have to worry about form fields having name clashes with the form class methods. (Otherwise you couldn’t have a field named ‘clean’ or ‘is_valid’) Defining the fields directly in the class body is mostly just a convenience.

Questions:
Answers:

You can set label as an attribute of field when you define form.

class GiftCardForm(forms.ModelForm):
    card_name = forms.CharField(max_length=100, label="Cardholder Name")
    card_number = forms.CharField(max_length=50, label="Card Number")
    card_code = forms.CharField(max_length=20, label="Security Code")
    card_expirate_time = forms.CharField(max_length=100, label="Expiration (MM/YYYY)")

    class Meta:
        model = models.GiftCard
        exclude = ('price', )

Questions:
Answers:

It don’t work for model inheritance, but you can set the label directly in the model

email = models.EmailField("E-Mail Address")
email_confirmation = models.EmailField("Please repeat")