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Does an IO completetion port spawn a new thread before or after the completion port has something to report?

Posted by: admin February 27, 2018 Leave a comment

Questions:

I am a bit confused as to what actually happens when an IO completion port completes.

I presume that the Win API allows access to an IOCP queue that somehow is able to queue (or stack) a callback reference with a specific handle (let’s say a socket).
When windows receives an interrupt from the NIC, then it at some point gets to the IOCP queue for the NIC and executes the callbacks on its own (IOCP) thread pool.

My question is, is this thread from the thread pool spawned upon the interrupt being received, or is it in fact spawned when the call to the Win API is made, effectively having the thread in a wait state until it is then woken by the IOCP queue?

EDIT:
I found this: http://msmvps.com/blogs/luisabreu/archive/2009/06/04/multithreading-i-o-and-the-thread-pool.aspx where is states: “Whenever that operation completes, it will queue a packet on that I/O completion port. The port will then proceed and use one of the thread pool’s thread to run the callback you’ve specified.”

Answers:

It’s probably easier to think of an I/O completion port simply as a thread safe queue that the operating system places the results of overlapped operations into for you when they have completed.

You create the IOCP, you then create some threads and these threads call a function to remove items from this queue. Generally this is GetQueuedCompletionStatus(). This function essentially blocks your thread until there’s something in the IOCP (queue) and then allows your thread to retrieve that something and run.

You associate file handles and sockets with the IOCP and this simply means that once associated their overlapped completions will be placed in the IOCP (queue) for you.

It’s more complex than that, but that’s the way you should be thinking.