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Getting day suffix when using DateTime.ToString()

Posted by: admin November 30, 2017 Leave a comment

Questions:

Is it possible to include the day suffix when formatting a date using DateTime.ToString()?

For example I would like to print the date in the following format – Monday 27th July 2009. However the closest example I can find using DateTime.ToString() is Monday 27 July 2009.

Can I do this with DateTime.ToString() or am I going to have to fall back to my own code?

Answers:

As a reference I always use/refer to SteveX String Formatting
and there doesn’t appear to be any “th” in any of the available variables but you could easily build a string with

string.Format("{0:dddd dd}{1} {0:MMMM yyyy}", DateTime.Now, (?));

You would then have to supply a “st” for 1, “nd” for 2, “rd” for 3, and “th” for all others and could be in-lined with a “? :” statement.

(DateTime.Now.Day % 10 == 1 && DateTime.Now.Day != 11) ? "st"
: (DateTime.Now.Day % 10 == 2 && DateTime.Now.Day != 12) ? "nd"
: (DateTime.Now.Day % 10 == 3 && DateTime.Now.Day != 13) ? "rd"
: "th"

Questions:
Answers:

Another option using switch:

string GetDaySuffix(int day)
{
    switch (day)
    {
        case 1:
        case 21:
        case 31:
            return "st";
        case 2:
        case 22:
            return "nd";
        case 3:
        case 23:
            return "rd";
        default:
            return "th";
    }
}

Questions:
Answers:

Using a couple of extension methods:

namespace System
{
    public static class IntegerExtensions
    {
        public static string ToOccurrenceSuffix(this int integer)
        {
            switch (integer % 100)
            {
                case 11:
                case 12:
                case 13:
                    return "th";
            }
            switch (integer % 10)
            {
                case 1:
                    return "st";
                case 2:
                    return "nd";
                case 3:
                    return "rd";
                default:
                    return "th";
            }
        }
    }   

    public static class DateTimeExtensions
    {
        public static string ToString(this DateTime dateTime, string format, bool useExtendedSpecifiers)
        {
            return dateTime.ToString(format)
                .Replace("nn", dateTime.Day.ToOccurrenceSuffix().ToLower())
                .Replace("NN", dateTime.Day.ToOccurrenceSuffix().ToUpper());
        } 
    }
}

Usage:

return DateTime.Now.ToString("dddd, dnn MMMM yyyy", useExtendedSpecifiers: true);
// Friday, 7th March 2014

Note: The integer extension method can be used for any number, not just 1 to 31. e.g.

return 332211.ToOccurrenceSuffix();
// th

Questions:
Answers:

Another option is using the Modulo Operator:

public string CreateDateSuffix(DateTime date)
{
    // Get day...
    var day = date.Day;

    // Get day modulo...
    var dayModulo = day%10;

    // Convert day to string...
    var suffix = day.ToString(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);

    // Combine day with correct suffix...
    suffix += (day == 11 || day == 12 || day == 13) ? "th" :
        (dayModulo == 1) ? "st" :
        (dayModulo == 2) ? "nd" :
        (dayModulo == 3) ? "rd" :
        "th";

    // Return result...
    return suffix;
}

Questions:
Answers:

Here is extended version including 11th, 12th and 13th:

DateTime dt = DateTime.Now;
string d2d = dt.ToString("dd").Substring(1);
string daySuffix =
    (dt.Day == 11 || dt.Day == 12 || dt.Day == 13) ? "th"
    : (d2d == "1") ? "st"
    : (d2d == "2") ? "nd"
    : (d2d == "3") ? "rd"
    : "th";

Questions:
Answers:

Here’s an extension method (because everyone loves extension methods), with Lazlow’s answer as the basis (picked Lazlow’s as it’s easy to read).

Works just like the regular ToString() method on DateTime with the exception that if the format contains a d or dd, then the suffix will be added automatically.

/// <summary>
/// Return a DateTime string with suffix e.g. "st", "nd", "rd", "th"
/// So a format "dd-MMM-yyyy" could return "16th-Jan-2014"
/// </summary>
public static string ToStringWithSuffix(this DateTime dateTime, string format, string suffixPlaceHolder = "$") {
    if(format.LastIndexOf("d", StringComparison.Ordinal) == -1 || format.Count(x => x == 'd') > 2) {
        return dateTime.ToString(format);
    }

    string suffix;
    switch(dateTime.Day) {
        case 1:
        case 21:
        case 31:
            suffix = "st";
            break;
        case 2:
        case 22:
            suffix = "nd";
            break;
        case 3:
        case 23:
            suffix = "rd";
            break;
        default:
            suffix = "th";
            break;
    }

    var formatWithSuffix = format.Insert(format.LastIndexOf("d", StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase) + 1, suffixPlaceHolder);
    var date = dateTime.ToString(formatWithSuffix);

    return date.Replace(suffixPlaceHolder, suffix);
}

Questions:
Answers:

Taking @Lazlow’s answer to a complete solution, the following is a fully reusable extension method, with example usage;

internal static string HumanisedDate(this DateTime date)
{
    string ordinal;

    switch (date.Day)
    {
        case 1:
        case 21:
        case 31:
            ordinal = "st";
            break;
        case 2:
        case 22:
            ordinal = "nd";
            break;
        case 3:
        case 23:
            ordinal = "rd";
            break;
        default:
            ordinal = "th";
            break;
    }

    return string.Format("{0:dddd dd}{1} {0:MMMM yyyy}", date, ordinal);
} 

To use this you would simply call it on a DateTime object;

var myDate = DateTime.Now();
var myDateString = myDate.HumanisedFormat()

Which will give you:

Friday 17th June 2016

Questions:
Answers:

I believe this to be a good solution, covering numbers such as 111th etc:

private string daySuffix(int day)
{
    if (day > 0)
    {
        if (day % 10 == 1 && day % 100 != 11)
            return "st";
        else if (day % 10 == 2 && day % 100 != 12)
            return "nd";
        else if (day % 10 == 3 && day % 100 != 13)
            return "rd";
        else
            return "th";
    }
    else
        return string.Empty;
}

Questions:
Answers:

I did it like this, it gets around some of the problems given in the other examples.

    public static string TwoLetterSuffix(this DateTime @this)
    {
        var dayMod10 = @this.Day % 10;

        if (dayMod10 > 3 || dayMod10 == 0 || (@this.Day >= 10 && @this.Day <= 19))
        {
            return "th";
        }
        else if(dayMod10 == 1)
        {
            return "st";
        }
        else if (dayMod10 == 2)
        {
            return "nd";
        }
        else
        {
            return "rd";
        }
    }

Questions:
Answers:

A cheap and cheerful VB solution:

litDate.Text = DatePart("dd", Now) & GetDateSuffix(DatePart("dd", Now))

Function GetDateSuffix(ByVal dateIn As Integer) As String

    '// returns formatted date suffix

    Dim dateSuffix As String = ""
    Select Case dateIn
        Case 1, 21, 31
            dateSuffix = "st"
        Case 2, 22
            dateSuffix = "nd"
        Case 3, 23
            dateSuffix = "rd"
        Case Else
            dateSuffix = "th"
    End Select

    Return dateSuffix

End Function

Questions:
Answers:

For what its worth here is my final solution using the below answers

     DateTime dt = DateTime.Now;
        string d2d = dt.ToString("dd").Substring(1); 

        string suffix =
       (dt.Day == 11 || dt.Day == 12 || dt.Day == 13) ? "th"
       : (d2d == "1") ? "st"
       : (d2d == "2") ? "nd"
       : (d2d == "3") ? "rd"
       : "th";


        Date.Text = DateTime.Today.ToString("dddd d") + suffix + " " + DateTime.Today.ToString("MMMM") + DateTime.Today.ToString(" yyyy"); 

Questions:
Answers:

public static String SuffixDate(DateTime date)
{
string ordinal;

     switch (date.Day)
     {
        case 1:
        case 21:
        case 31:
           ordinal = "st";
           break;
        case 2:
        case 22:
           ordinal = "nd";
           break;
        case 3:
        case 23:
           ordinal = "rd";
           break;
        default:
           ordinal = "th";
           break;
     }
     if (date.Day < 10)
        return string.Format("{0:d}{2} {1:MMMM yyyy}", date.Day, date, ordinal);
     else
        return string.Format("{0:dd}{1} {0:MMMM yyyy}", date, ordinal);
  }

Questions:
Answers:

in the MSDN documentation there is no reference to a culture that could convert that 17 into 17th. so You should do it manually via code-behind.Or build one…you could build a function that does that.

public string CustomToString(this DateTime date)
    {
        string dateAsString = string.empty;
        <here wright your code to convert 17 to 17th>
        return dateAsString;
    }

Questions:
Answers:

Another option using the last string character:

public static string getDayWithSuffix(int day) {
 string d = day.ToString();
 if (day < 11 || day > 13) {
  if (d.EndsWith("1")) {
   d += "st";
  } else if (d.EndsWith("2")) {
   d += "nd";
  } else if (d.EndsWith("3")) {
   d += "rd";
  } else {
   d += "th";
 } else {
  d += "th";
 }
 return d;
}