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How can I Insert many rows into a MySQL table and return the new IDs?

Posted by: admin November 1, 2017 Leave a comment

Questions:

Normally I can insert a row into a MySQL table and get the last_insert_id back. Now, though, I want to bulk insert many rows into the table and get back an array of IDs. Does anyone know how I can do this?

There are some similar questions, but they are not exactly the same. I don’t want to insert the new ID to any temporary table; I just want to get back the array of IDs.

Can I retrieve the lastInsertId from a bulk insert?

Mysql mulitple row insert-select statement with last_insert_id()

Answers:

Old thread but just looked into this, so here goes: if you are using InnoDB on a recent version of MySQL, you can get the list of IDs using LAST_INSERT_ID() and ROW_COUNT().

InnoDB guarantees sequential numbers for AUTO INCREMENT when doing bulk inserts, provided innodb_autoinc_lock_mode is set to 0 (traditional) or 1 (consecutive).
Consequently you can get the first ID from LAST_INSERT_ID() and the last by adding ROW_COUNT()-1.

Questions:
Answers:

The only way I can think it could be done is if you store a unique identifier for each set of rows inserted (guid)
then select the row ids.
e.g:

INSERT INTO t1
(SELECT col1,col2,col3,'3aee88e2-a981-1027-a396-84f02afe7c70' FROM a_very_large_table);
COMMIT;

SELECT id FROM t1 
WHERE guid='3aee88e2-a981-1027-a396-84f02afe7c70';

You could also generate the guid in the database by using uuid()

Questions:
Answers:

Lets assume we have a table called temptable with two cols uid, col1 where uid is an auto increment field. Doing something like below will return all the inserted id’s in the resultset. You can loop through the resultset and get your id’s. I realize that this is an old post and this solution might not work for every case. But for others it might and that’s why I’m replying to it.

# lock the table
lock tables temptable write;

#bulk insert the rows;
insert into temptable(col1) values(1),(2),(3),(4);

#get the value of first inserted row. when bulk inserting last_insert_id() #should give the value of first inserted row from bulk op.
set @first_id = last_insert_id();

#now select the auto increment field whose value is greater than equal to #the first row. Remember since you have write lock on that table other #sessions can't write to it. This resultset should have all the inserted #id's
select uid from temptable where uid >[email protected]_id;

#now that you are done don't forget to unlock the table.
unlock tables;

Questions:
Answers:

I think you will have to either handle the transaction id in your application, or the item id in your application in order to do this flawlessly.

One way to do this which could work, assuming that all your inserts succeed (!), is the following :

You can then get the inserted id’s with a loop for the number of affected rows, starting with lastid (which is the first inserted id of the bulk insert).
And thus, i checked it works perfectly .. just be careful that HeidiSQL for example will not return the correct value for ROW_COUNT(), probably because it’s a crappy GUI doing random shit we don’t ask it – however it’s perfectly correct from either command line or PHP mysqli –

START TRANSACTION;
BEGIN;
INSERT into test (b) VALUES ('1'),('2'),('3');
SELECT LAST_INSERT_ID() AS lastid,ROW_COUNT() AS rowcount;
COMMIT;

In PHP it looks like this (local_sqle is a straight call to mysqli_query, local_sqlec is a call to mysqli_query + convert resultset to PHP array) :

local_sqle("START TRANSACTION;
BEGIN;
INSERT into test (b) VALUES ('1'),('2'),('3');");
$r=local_sqlec("SELECT LAST_INSERT_ID() AS lastid,ROW_COUNT() AS rowcount;");
local_sqle("
COMMIT;");
$i=0;
echo "last id =".($r[0]['lastid'])."<br>";
echo "Row count =".($r[0]['rowcount'])."<br>";

while($i<$r[0]['rowcount']){
    echo "inserted id =".($r[0]['lastid']+$i)."<br>";
    $i++;
}

The reason the queries are separated is because I wouldn’t otherwise get my result using my own functions, if you do this with standard functions, you can put it back in one statement and then retrieve the result you need (it should be result number 2 – assuming you use an extension which handles more than one result set / query).

Questions:
Answers:
$query = "INSERT INTO TABLE (ID,NAME,EMAIL) VALUES (NULL,VALUE1, VALUE2)";
$idArray = array();
foreach($array as $key) {
 mysql_query($query);
 array_push($idArray, mysql_insert_id());
}
print_r($idArray);