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How to break out from a ruby block?

Posted by: admin November 26, 2017 Leave a comment

Questions:

Here is Bar#do_things:

class Bar   
  def do_things
    Foo.some_method(x) do |x|
      y = x.do_something
      return y_is_bad if y.bad? # how do i tell it to stop and return do_things? 
      y.do_something_else
    end
    keep_doing_more_things
  end
end

And here is Foo#some_method:

class Foo
  def self.some_method(targets, &block)
    targets.each do |target|
      begin
        r = yield(target)
      rescue 
        failed << target
      end
    end
  end
end

I thought about using raise, but I am trying to make it generic, so I don’t want to put anything any specific in Foo.

Answers:

Use the keyword next. If you do not want to continue to the next item, use break.

When next is used within a block, it causes the block to exit immediately, returning control to the iterator method, which may then begin a new iteration by invoking the block again:

f.each do |line|              # Iterate over the lines in file f
  next if line[0,1] == "#"    # If this line is a comment, go to the next
  puts eval(line)
end

When used in a block, break transfers control out of the block, out of the iterator that invoked the block, and to the first expression following the invocation of the iterator:

f.each do |line|             # Iterate over the lines in file f
  break if line == "quit\n"  # If this break statement is executed...
  puts eval(line)
end
puts "Good bye"              # ...then control is transferred here

And finally, the usage of return in a block:

return always causes the enclosing method to return, regardless of how deeply nested within blocks it is (except in the case of lambdas):

def find(array, target)
  array.each_with_index do |element,index|
    return index if (element == target)  # return from find
  end
  nil  # If we didn't find the element, return nil
end

Questions:
Answers:

I wanted to just be able to break out of a block – sort of like a forward goto, not really related to a loop. In fact, I want to break of of a block that is in a loop without terminating the loop. To do that, I made the block a one-iteration loop:

for b in 1..2 do
    puts b
    begin
        puts 'want this to run'
        break
        puts 'but not this'
    end while false
    puts 'also want this to run'
end

Hope this helps the next googler that lands here based on the subject line.

Questions:
Answers:

If you want your block to return a useful value (e.g. when using #map, #inject, etc.), next and break also accept an argument.

Consider the following:

def contrived_example(numbers)
  numbers.inject(0) do |count, x|
    if x % 3 == 0
      count + 2
    elsif x.odd?
      count + 1
    else 
      count
    end
  end
end

The equivalent using next:

def contrived_example(numbers)
  numbers.inject(0) do |count, x|
    next count if x.even?
    next (count + 2) if x % 3 == 0
    count + 1
  end
end

Of course, you could always extract the logic needed into a method and call that from inside your block:

def contrived_example(numbers)
  numbers.inject(0) { |count, x| count + extracted_logic(x) }
end

def extracted_logic(x)
  return 0 if x.even?
  return 2 if x % 3 == 0
  1
end

Questions:
Answers:

use the keyword break instead of return

Questions:
Answers:

Perhaps you can use the built-in methods for finding particular items in an Array, instead of each-ing targets and doing everything by hand. A few examples:

class Array
  def first_frog
    detect {|i| i =~ /frog/ }
  end

  def last_frog
    select {|i| i =~ /frog/ }.last
  end
end

p ["dog", "cat", "godzilla", "dogfrog", "woot", "catfrog"].first_frog
# => "dogfrog"
p ["hats", "coats"].first_frog
# => nil
p ["houses", "frogcars", "bottles", "superfrogs"].last_frog
# => "superfrogs"

One example would be doing something like this:

class Bar
  def do_things
    Foo.some_method(x) do |i|
      # only valid `targets` here, yay.
    end
  end
end

class Foo
  def self.failed
    @failed ||= []
  end

  def self.some_method(targets, &block)
    targets.reject {|t| t.do_something.bad? }.each(&block)
  end
end

Questions:
Answers:

next and break seem to do the correct thing in this simplified example!

class Bar
  def self.do_things
      Foo.some_method(1..10) do |x|
            next if x == 2
            break if x == 9
            print "#{x} "
      end
  end
end

class Foo
    def self.some_method(targets, &block)
      targets.each do |target|
        begin
          r = yield(target)
        rescue  => x
          puts "rescue #{x}"
        end
     end
   end
end

Bar.do_things

output: 1 3 4 5 6 7 8

Questions:
Answers:

To break the loop or exit of the loop just simply use return next keyword
return if element.nil? next if element.nil?

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