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How to conduct an Accent Sensitive search in MySql

Posted by: admin November 1, 2017 Leave a comment

Questions:

I have a MySQL table with utf8 general ci collation. In the table, I can see two entries:

abad
abád

I am using a query that looks like this:

SELECT *  FROM `words` WHERE `word` = 'abád'

The query result gives both words:

abad
abád

Is there a way to indicate that I only want MySQL to find the accented word? I want the query to only return

abád

I have also tried this query:

SELECT *  FROM `words` WHERE BINARY `word` = 'abád'

It gives me no results. Thank you for the help.

Answers:

If your searches on that field are always going to be accent-sensitive, then declare the collation of the field as utf8_bin (that’ll compare for equality the utf8-encoded bytes) or use a language specific collation that distinguish between the accented and un-accented characters.

col_name varchar(10) collate utf8_bin

If searches are normally accent-insensitive, but you want to make an exception for this search, try;

WHERE col_name = 'abád' collate utf8_bin

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In my version (MySql 5.0), there is not available any utf8 charset collate for case insensitive, accent sensitive searches. The only accent sensitive collate for utf8 is utf8_bin. However it is also case sensitive.

My work around has been to use something like this:

SELECT * FROM `words` WHERE LOWER(column) = LOWER('aBád') COLLATE utf8_bin

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The MySQL bug, for future reference, is http://bugs.mysql.com/bug.php?id=19567.

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SELECT *  FROM `words` WHERE column = 'abád' collate latin1_General_CS 

(or your collation including cs)

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You can try searching for the hex variable of the character, HEX() within mysql and use a similar function within your programming language and match these. This worked well for me when i was doing a listing where a person could select the first letter of a person.

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Well, you just described what utf8_general_ci collation is all about (a, á, à, â, ä, å all equals to a in comparison).

There have also been changes in MySQL server 5.1 in regards to utf8_general_ci and utf8_unicode_ci so it’s server version dependent too. Better check the docs.

So, If it’s MySQL server 5.0 I’d go for utf8_unicode_ci instead of utf8_general_ci which is obviously wrong for your use-case.

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I was getting the same error.

I’ve changed the collation of my table to utf8_bin (through phpMyAdmin) and the problem was solved.

Hope it helps! 🙂

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Check to see if the database table collation type end with “_ci”, This stands for case insensitive…

Change it to collation the the same or nearest name without the “_ci” …

For example… change “utf8_general_ci” to “utf8_bin”
Mke